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Hello there, non-existent readers.

It’s been a while. Between 2008 and now, I’ve successfully (one credit shy) completed my bachelor’s degree in English. So that happened.

But this change has got me thinking. If, after more than a year, this blog still exists, and I still want to publish, and I’ve got time now, and MySpace is trying really hard to be FaceBook, and I don’t really have another outlet…then why not pick the old blog back up?

I started this blog as an assignment for a class called “Writing Online.” I was a bit disappointed in that class, though the teacher was knowledgeable and engaged. Nothing wrong with her, no. But I got very little out of the class. I was far too busy to heed– let alone remember– my own advice about publishing. But now that I’ve graduated (eek) and I’ve a bit more time, I will perhaps continue my search for a good place to publish my work. I may also post sneak-peeks and works in progress.

I WELCOME FEEDBACK, as this is my livelihood and my heart. But I don’t just write for my own gratification. I don’t go on verbal rampages about the destruction of the English language or have grammatical fits for my own benefit. I really believe in the community of language, and the importance of understanding. Without language, we fail to understand one another. Without understanding, there can be no growth. So if you’ve stumbled across this blog, and you’re interested in something you read, or even just really annoyed by it, feel free to tell me. You’re better than half the reason I’d do this in the first place.

Welcome back to littlepoetpublishing. And welcome to 2010! May new leaves turn over for all of us.

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Frankly, I’m snooping around using one simple criteria, and that is whether or not I like the name of the company. From there, I’m hunting to see what kind of work they’re looking to publish, and if I think they might be interested in my poetry.

In the meantime, I really wonder if I need an editor or an agent or something, or if I can do this myself. I’ll probably interview one of the poets I know who has already been through this, and ask them. Experience is a great resource, after all. Anyway…

1. Osprey Publishing: military history. Ok, clearly not my bag. Though a collection of poetry based on military history might be interesting to read, and probably really fun to write, I think I shan’t tackle that just now.

2. Other Press: http://www.otherpress.com/ does poetry, but there are only seven books listed on the site. They include some pretty big names, but they’re also older names. Some conversation between Robert Frost and Edward Thomas; some Hafiz (who was a 13th century Sufi. Brilliant stuff, way out of my scope.); poetry by Afghan women. What this tells me is that these guys probably aren’t going to look twice at a contemporary poet, let alone an aspiring one. So this sure doesn’t look like a good fit.

3. Steerforth Press http://steerforth.com does poetry through Zoland…which seems to be an anthology. It “brings together original English poems, translations into English, and interviews with featured poets.” Well, it’s getting closer, but there are thousands of poets who write bilingually, and somehow I just haven’t found the time to learn Spanish like I’ve been meaning to. This may not be a great fit either, but it looks like an interesting company. Plus I’ve got a really soft spot for poetry in other languages, translated or not. I love the sound, the craft of the word. …But wait! This is actually pretty cool.

What instantly sets Zoland Poetry apart from other anthologies is that all the work is previously unpublished and the translations are presented as an integral part of the contemporary poetry scene, rather than as something exotic slipped between the pages of a book filled primarily with English-language poets. Equal footing is given to voices from Italy, Iran, Argentina, Poland, and across the United States.”

Regardless, I don’t think it’s something I should pursue just now. Plus, it’s an anthology, and I’m looking to put out a chapbook or a short collection of my own.

Ok, so that’s 3. If you’re feeling really brave, you can google “publish poetry,” but I warn you, there’s a lot of self-publishing scratch running around the good ol’ internets, and to be honest, I really don’t want to fiddle with it. I don’t like the current link between “self-publishing” and “not good enough to get published any other way.” I mean, if that turns out to be the case, then sure. I won’t publish. But the idea is to get a reputation as a respected poet, and self-publishing feels super hokey to me. There is, however, a website called searchforpublishers.com that might have some insight. It supposedly provides free services to budding authors, and is designed to match the right publishing company with the right writer. They sure do ask for a lot of personal information, though. Address, phone, email, and they’re all required fields. I’m personally sort of wary of such things, so maybe I’ll just hunt a little further.

More on publishing.

The idea of trying to get a few poems published in a quarterly or eight is a good one, but ultimately my career as a poet won’t fly if I’m not publishing collections at some point not far in the future. Which, of course, is part of why I’m keeping this silly blog.

So this time I’m researching publishing houses. First, I picked Random House. http://www.randomhouse.biz/publisherservices/ has this to say: Random House Publisher Services (RHPS) distinguishes itself
from other distributors or publishers who distribute third party
content in a number of ways. Our state-of-the-art facilities,
unparalleled expertise and cutting-edge technologies are available to
all of our client publishers. We provide a rare combination of
large-scale efficiency and attention to detail that is critical in
successfully navigating today’s increasingly complex market place.
Through our services, clients can expect to achieve significant
improvements in business performance while minimizing operating costs
and capital expenditures. This allows our clients to focus on what they
do best: publish books.

As an experienced book distributor, we fulfill the
unique business needs of each publisher by offering flexibility, timely
feedback, and exceptional customer service. We are eager to share our
extensive resources with clients in a concerted effort to foster sales
growth while maximizing efficiency through each part of the supply
chain. Our clients can expect the highest standard of service, and
benefit from the strong relationships Random House has with its vendors
and customers.

Competitive Advantages

  • Random
    House offers its existing scale of operations, well-established
    distribution channels, and world-class facilities that clients can
    leverage, resulting in increased efficiencies.
  • Publisher
    clients benefit from Random House’s strong relationships with its
    vendors and customers, as well as its position as an industry innovator.
  • Web-based
    Information reporting gives detailed, real time data in an intuitive,
    easy-to-use application. The online reporting tools offer an enormously
    rich source of information, giving the client visibility into sales
    history, inventory, rate of movement and point-of-sale.
  • RHPS
    has dedicated resources throughout the organization, structured to give
    the highest level of service to our publisher clients.

Problem: this doesn’t tell me anything about how to get published. So I snooped around a little more: ullfillment Services
Random House Publisher
Services has two distribution centers. Our facility in Westminster, MD.
is a 1.2 million square foot space that also includes all customer
service, accounts payable & receivable, telephone sales and a state
of the art data center. Our facility in Crawfordsville, IN is a 650,000
square foot space that also processes all North American returns.

On-going investments in integrated technologies such
as MARC, SAP and IRISTA ensure top-level efficiency across all aspects
of fulfillment operations resulting in:

  • 33 million order lines each year with over 99% picking accuracy
  • Shipments to over 15,000 locations at least once a week
  • Over 1 million units shipped each day
  • Quick turnaround time between order receipt and freight out for majority of orders

Our Warehouse Facility
With the largest and most efficient distribution platform, our capacity and capabilities are unrivaled in the industry.

  • Over 1.8 million total square feet
  • 150,000 pallet positions
  • 50,000+ picking locations
  • Storage for 190 million units

Capabilities within Fulfillment Services include:

  • Warehousing
  • Customer Service
  • Order Fulfillment
  • Special Handling
  • Shipping
  • Returns Processing
  • Billing/Collections
  • Customer Credit Management
  • Sales Reporting
  • Inventory Control
  • Web-Access to Sales & Inventory Information

Sales Services
Clients who choose to have RHPS handle trade sales reap the benefit of
being sold by the largest, and most esteemed sales force in the
industry. This translates into their books penetrating more channels
and being presented to buyers earlier. Our sales team is organized by
channel: book chains, independent booksellers, wholesalers, mass
merchandisers, warehouse clubs, special markets and international.
Nearly all of our clients experience marked increases in both frontlist
and backlist sales, while improving efficiency and return rates.

Sales Support
One key RHPS differentiator is the sales support team. We’ve
established a structure that keeps our publisher clients’ sales within
the greater RH Sales organization, while maintaining dedicated
resources that ensure proper focus. We feel it’s critical to integrate
the sales efforts of our internal (RH) and external (client) imprints
to ensure effective communication and a targeted account strategy.

Our sales support team’s sole mission is to provide
the day-to-day management and liaison between the client publisher and
the sales organization. This group is managed by a veteran industry
executive with a team of experienced sales management professionals.

Additional Services
We are also able to provide a number of added value business solutions that are priced separately, some of which include:

Production Services, Digital Content Services, and Direct-to-Consumer Sales.

Interesting information about lots of services, but not how an individual, broke poet can get her work accepted. Where do I submit a manuscript? Do I really need an agent?

Then I found Publisher services, under their clients tab.

RHPS is proud to have these fine publishers as clients:

Allworth Press
http://www.allworth.com/
Candlewick Press
http://www.candlewick.com/
Circulo de Lectores
http://www.circulo.es/Libros/
DC Comics
http://www.dccomics.com/
Egmont USA
http://www.egmont-us.com/
Hatherleigh Press
http://www.hatherleighpress.com/
Kuperard
http://www.kuperard.co.uk/
Melville House Publishing
http://www.mhpbooks.com/
National Geographic
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/
New York Review Books
http://www.nybooks.com/
North Atlantic Books
http://www.northatlanticbooks.com/
Osprey Publishing
http://www.ospreypublishing.com/
Other Press
http://www.otherpress.com/
Oveja Negra Editores
 
Random House Mondadori
http://www.randomhousemondadori.es/
Rizzoli USA
http://www.rizzoliusa.com/
Shambhala Publications
http://www.shambhala.com/
Steerforth Press
http://www.steerforth.com/
Titan Books
http://www.titanbooks.com/
Vertical, Inc.
http://www.vertical-inc.com/
Welcome Books
http://www.welcomebooks.com/
Wizards of the Coast
http://www.wizards.com/

From here, I’ll research which, if any, of these publishers that work with Random House, which is really a distribution company, might accept my manuscript and what the qualifications are.

Here’s the piece that was published in Weird Sisters West, back in April. It is, truth be told, a first draft. The editor decided that it was perfect just the way I sent it to her, and so it went out of my hands and into print.

Of course, I could revise it. But it seems to do the poem a disservice, delegitimate the integrity of print, somehow, to change it after it’s been published. So, so far I haven’t changed it.

As shown in the last post, it’s usually the policy of quarterlies to publish only previously unpublished material, so this one couldn’t go on the list of submittable poems. And I worry about some conflict of interest if I post possible submission pieces here. This is causing a minor problem with content for this blog, and forcing me (hooray!) to work on pieces I’m unhappy with, or that I downright hate, rather than ones I’m more confident with.

Alright. Without further ado, my very first published  poem:

[list]
(with thanks to Rusty Morrison–a wee theft.)

O lava lamp (no cap)
O wall of nudes (no faces)
Fifty years of photographs
in cheap three-ring binders (I didn’t look)
O heavy sleep
O heavy heart, please
advise.

O tribe of the five tongues, some things are far more simple (than our intelligentsia might lift, sniff, heft in a palm but never buy, instead leaving grubby fingerprints for exhausted stay-at-home mothers) such as
Greek
bleeding vocal chords
umbilicus of words
cracking of flagstone as its purpose (and integrity)
slowly slip its mind

O round table, oranges and wine glasses
weigh you
under cascading mouths
all not saying
O heavy heart, please stop.

2. Romanticism will win the bout with pragmatism every time. Even Wm. James was smashed up against the wall by illness and paralysis before he had to admit that being realistic, and using what you’ve got, beats sighing at the moon. Once a body knows pain, romance– unrealistic, lacking detail–looks pretty good compared to the sling.

3. A major Infraction or Violation (of boundary, of trust)
sometimes takes twenty poems
before it is satisfied and
will finally sit down to coffee and the business section.

4. For a man who has earned a whole head of
shock-white hair,
snowy beard
the fat, smooth fingers of heavy drinking,
walls of memory that proliferate–
there are so few feminine things in his home.
Where are the pictures of the woman that bore your daughters?

5. I can no longer ignore
that sex trumps intelligence
every time.
The hopeful, soft-skinned ignoramus
is officially dead.
Here’s the certificate.
No, I don’t know why it’s in so many languages.
I don’t know, Honduras?
No I don’t know about insurance.
No, no. Look. It’s too early. Let us grieve a little. You people have no souls! The bill will be paid when we’ve cried ourselves

right

out.

6. O vicious light-breeze morning
O blurred vision
misplaced keys and fury
O unpracticed hands that try and try
to smooth wrinkles out of scapulae
dealt by pressures of promises forgotten

None of this is news.

I’ve been published once. One poem in a small-distribution magazine in Denver, called Weird Sisters West: http://www.weirdsisters.org/ I’ve been thinking about this whole chapbook thing for years, trying to build up the courage to actually try to get a collection published. There are thousands of questions one could ask, in terms of details. Is the collection going to be made up of all related poems? Will there be a unifying theme, or could it include all manner of themes? Will the poems be similar style, or include haiku, experimental/found poetry, freeform, traditional styles? How many poems? Where, oh where to begin the submission process? How to choose?

I have absolutely no idea, so I’m doing some research.

At the same time, I’m thinking about submitting to quarterlies. The reason I like this idea is because it could potentially help to begin making a name. Nobody’s going to buy a collection if nobody’s heard of you. It’s one of the eternal problems with publishing (I think, especially) poetry. How do you get your name out there? I have a personal distaste for marketing, and I don’t care for fame…so it’s likely I’ll use a nom de plume. If I ever succeed in being published. I’m nowhere near there yet.

Anyhow…here are a few submission guideline examples. The first is from Tin House. I include it because though it may not be realistic to get published there, I really like many of the poets their editors choose.

Tin House Magazine Writers Guidelines

The Spring 2009 theme of Tin House will be Appetites—for food, sex, drugs, drink, and our collective appetites for resources, entertainment, gratification, humiliation, etc… We’re looking for stories, poems, and essays that address the Webster’s definitions for Appetite:  “an inherent craving” or “any of the instinctive desires necessary to keep up organic life.” Our deadline is December 1, but please submit early as the issue will fill quickly. Appetites will be in stores March 1 through June 1.

Please submit one story or essay (10,000 word limit), or up to five poems at a time, to Tin House, PO Box 10500, Portland, OR 97210. Enclose an SASE (or IRC for international submissions) or we cannot guarantee a response to or the return of your work. We attempt to respond within three months, however, some responses may take longer. We welcome email inquiries on submissions once 90 days have passed. Wait to hear back from us before sending more work. Please do not fax or e-mail your submission. We accept simultaneous submissions, but inform us immediately if your work is accepted for publication elsewhere. We only accept previously unpublished work. Our reading period for unsolicited work is September 1 through May 31 (postmark dates). Any unsolicited submissions received outside this period will be returned unread. Any submissions received with postage due will be returned unread.

Manuscripts must have the page number and the authors’ names on each page, starting with the title page, as well as the word “end” on the final page of the submission. On the cover letter, writers must indicate word count, and whether the submission is fiction, nonfiction, or poetry. Also, please note whether or not you would like your manuscript returned.

Here’s another, from Ninth Letter. Same reasons for including it in examples…cutting edge, willing to do strange, interesting poets and fiction writers being published there.

Submission Guidelines

Ninth Letter is accepting submissions of fiction, poetry, essays, and interviews from September 1 to April 30 (postmark dates). Ninth Letter is a published semi-annually at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. We are interested in prose and poetry that experiment with form, narrative, and nontraditional subject matter, as well as more traditional literary work. To make life easier for everyone, including yourself, please adhere to the following guidelines when submitting your work to Ninth Letter:

For poetry, submit 3-6 poems (max. 10 pages) at a time. For fiction and nonfiction, please send only one story or one essay at a time, up to 8,000 words.

Single- or double-sided copies are okay. Do not send a second submission until you have received a response to the first. We do not accept previously published work.

To submit electronically, visit our online submissions manager., and carefully read the instructions there prior to submitting

We also do not accept submissions by email attachment—email submissions will not be read.

Submissions via USPS should be addressed to Fiction Editor, Poetry Editor, or Nonfiction Editor:

NINTH LETTER
University of Illinois
Department of English
608 South Wright St.
Urbana, IL 61801

Please include your name and contact information on the first page of your manuscript; cover letters are optional. All mailed submissions must include an SASE for reply; we recommend a stamped business-sized envelope. If you wish to have your manuscript returned, you must include adequate postage and a properly sized envelope, and indicate such in your cover letter. We will recycle all unreturned manuscripts.

You should hear from us regarding your submission within 8 weeks; if you haven’t heard from us in that time you are welcome to query about the status of your manuscript via mail or e-mail at info@ninthletter.com.

Ninth Letter pays $25 per printed page, upon publication, for accepted material, as well as two complimentary copies of the issue in which the work appears. Writers will be sent contracts upon acceptance of their work, and will receive page proofs prior to publication. Ninth Letter publishes one issue in the spring and one in the fall.

Contact

Editor – editor@ninthletter.com

Fiction Editor – fiction@ninthletter.com

Poetry Editor – poetry@ninthletter.com

Nonfiction Editor – nonfiction@ninthletter.com

And for the sake of argument, and because I’m a student at CSU, here’re the guidelines for the Colorado Review:

COLORADO REVIEW

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

FICTION & NONFICTION
We consider short fiction and personal essays with contemporary themes (no genre fiction or literary criticism). There is no specific word or page count; generally, however, Colorado Review publishes short stories and essays that are somewhere between 20 and 25 manuscript pages. Please submit one story or essay at a time.

POETRY
We consider poetry of any style. Please limit poetry submissions to no more than five poems at a time.

BOOK REVIEWS
We do not accept unsolicited book reviews. If you would like to submit a book review, please send a query to creview@colostate.edu.

FORMAT FOR ALL SUBMISSIONS
Manuscripts are read from September 1 to April 30. Manuscripts received between May 1 and August 31 will be returned unread.

  • All manuscripts must be typed (double-spaced for fiction and nonfiction; poetry may be single-spaced).

  • All manuscripts should be printed on white letter-sized paper.

  • Please include a cover letter.

  • Be sure your full name and address appear on the manuscript.

  • No submissions via e-mail.

  • Every submission MUST include a self-addressed stamped envelope OR an e-mail address for response.

  • Please tell us in your cover letter if you want your manuscript returned and include proper postage on your SASE.

Simultaneous submissions are accepted; writers must notify us immediately if the work is accepted elsewhere.

We consider only previously unpublished work.

We strongly encourage writers to be familiar with our magazine before submitting to it. Examples of work published in Colorado Review are posted on our website; sample copies are also available for $10 each, including postage.

SEND MANUSCRIPTS TO:
Colorado Review
9105 Campus Delivery
Dept. of English
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, Colorado 80523

———————————————————————————-

Word counts vary, but submission dates are super-close. And, lucky me, the times for submission happen to be right now. By next week, I’ll have sent at least 3 poems to each publication. We’ll see where it goes! It’s scary.

Second revision.

Except for the GLARING TYPO that I fixed, here’s the poem after revising once.

—————————————————————-

Road stretches (inner eye. premonition.) out beyond

known. Barometer’s dropping. Thunderheads.

And I can’t help but think about motion. About choice. About chances. All these mistakes, the thousands of microscopic decisions that lead us to bumpy backroads dirt asphalt gutters and drainage ditches confusion loss misconception resentment and

fear.

Maybe this is pre-trip-jitters, maybe fear-of-change. Maybe it’s just friction, tire rubber to wet concrete. Oil to piston to fan to exhaust to…

Somewhere Unknown. To autumn drift. To singing chill in fingertips, traffic, noise inner and outer.

Let silence descend into the mind. The hush of wind through still-thick foliage, as it drifts toward deeper winter slow. Allow all this to move through me:

the road

wind

worry

expectation of damage, more mistakes to stack on the teetering pile, but

freedom.                          Motion.                           New.

————————————————————————-

Here’s an interesting problem I’ve been running across a lot lately, in terms of writing an original as well as trying to revise. Recently I have a tendency to write  about (shocking!) things that are on my mind now, bothering me right now, as opposed to things that were problematic or shocking or wonderful or learning experiences somewhere in my past. Nothing wrong with that…except that I think it might not be so much stuff I should include in the nebulous as-yet-uncreated First Manuscript. They’re momentary, not as deep as I want them to be. And I tend to change my mind after I’ve had a little time to process said events. I change my mind a lot. This is one of those poems. I wrote, I went, I know how it worked out, I’m a little bitter about it. I want to trash the thing, never look at it again. Some poet some time in history said something about one in ten-thousand poems being actually worth something. Bless and curse that poet for being absolutely right.

So, with all this in mind, I’m going to mangle it.

————————————————————————-

Road stretches (inner eye. premonition.) out beyond

known. Barometer’s dropping. Thunderheads.

And I can’t help but think about motion. About choice. About chances. All these mistakes, the thousands of microscopic decisions that lead us to bumpy backroads dirt asphalt gutters and drainage ditches confusion loss misconception resentment and

fear.

Maybe this is fear-of-change (premonition.) Maybe it’s just friction, tire rubber to wet concrete. Oil to piston to fan to exhaust to…

Somewhere Unknown. To autumnal drift. To singing chill in fingertips, traffic, noise inner and outer. To the ghosts catching up. History repeating. History flying at 90 miles an hour toward i-told-you-so,

truck flying off the road.

Impact rocks through the body. Blink. Broken. Cold.

The body is not mine. I knew. There is sometimes no stopping the causal drift, no point hitting brakes. Change your mind. Change your phone number. Scrub off the pain. Hold your breath. Change your mind.

Let silence descend. The hush of wind through still-thick foliage, as it drifts toward deeper winter slow. Allow all this to move through me:

sirens.

the road.

wind.

worry.

expectation of damage, more mistakes to stack on the teetering pile, but allow for

freedom.                          Motion.                           New.

——————————————————————————-

I’ll have to leave it alone another week or so, and then…then we’ll see. As of this moment, it expresses better what I feel, in hindsight, and I think the changes/additions add depth.

Titles are strange. They’re like the elusive fly in the room, that you can hear but can’t find, until it starts annoying you while you’re trying to fall asleep. Poem titles, I think, need to be (for my work) somewhat directional, as in “indicating direction.” On the other hand, sometimes they seem to want to be misleading, ironic, or puns. Double-entendre is always welcome, and so I think I might call this one “Stormwatching.”

revising a freewrite.

Here’s the piece in its original form. I admit it’s bare-bones, but it’s a great place to start, especially since I’ve got issues with revision. It’ll be a fun challenge!

Road stretches (beyond my eyes, not now yet but soon) out beyond

known. Barometer’s dropping. Thunderheads.

And I can’t help but think about motion. About choice. About chances. All these mistakes, the thousands of microscopic decisions that lead us to bumpy backroads dirt asphalt gutters and drainage ditches confusion loss misconception resentment and

fear.

They call this the pre-trip-jitters. They call this fear-of-change. They call this hanging-on-to-ego. Maybe. Maybe it’s just friction, tire rubber to wet concrete. Oil to piston to fan to exhaust to…

Somewhere Unknown. To autumn drift. To singing chill in fingertips, traffic, noise inner and outer.

Let silence descend. The hush of wind through still-thick foliage, as it drifts toward even deeper winter slow. Allow all this to move through me:

the road

wind

worry

and expect not so much damage, more mistakes to stack on the teetering pile, but

freedom. Motion. New. It is the way of things.

In reading through it, the first thing I notice is that I don’t really like it. Does the piece capture my feeling? I’m not sure. The feeling I had was one of anticipation, some calculated worry, nervous tension. As I said, I went out of town for the weekend. I drove 600 miles. I went south past Pueblo, into essential wilderness, to help frame a custom cabin with a new friend of mine. It wasn’t the end of the world. I’ve done similar work before, I get along with the friend fine, my dog will love being outside. It’s not a feeling of terror. It’s not a feeling of having made a Mistake. Just … a little tense. But the poem isn’t just about the nerves involved with travel to new places. It’s also about the change of seasons, and the response-echo in myself during autumn. I slow down, get quieter, more thoughtful. And I knew I was traveling to a place rich in aspens, and they were in full autumn glow. Finally, the poem is about letting go of old patterns. Allowing oneself to trust that things can, indeed, be different than they were before. Scars are more lessons than tissue. That sort of sentiment. I think I can say that I’ve evoked the feeling partially in the original.

Second, the flow. There’s no excuse for having the same word in the first line of a poem…unless the repetition is intentional. So the first line’s gotta change.

Road stretches (inner eye. premonition.) out beyond

Better…more accurate, more interesting, but possibly more obtuse. We’ll work with my problems with being too obtuse later. I’m going to leave the second line alone for now, as I like that it’s clipped (sounds almost terse, it’s concise. A catalog.)

known. Barometer’s dropping. Thunderheads.

Then there’s this section that is much wordier, which lends itself well (in my opinion) to the speed of the poem. I want it to speed up here, as if the thoughts are sort of tumbling out uncontrolled. It is meant to indicate a sort of rushing nervousness, a panicky feeling. I’m not sure how I feel about the alliteration. That was an accident. The content…that’s about the road. Literally and figuratively. About driving, scenery, what is physically passed in transit. Figuratively, I’m trying to evoke barrenness, unpopulated area, functional dirty little-used space. And places of motion: gutters and drainage ditches. A feeling of being right on the edge of control. I think I could play that up a bit, but I’m not sure how to yet. So for now, we’ll leave this section be.

And I can’t help but think about motion. About choice. About chances. All these mistakes, the thousands of microscopic decisions that lead us to bumpy backroads dirt asphalt gutters and drainage ditches confusion loss misconception resentment and

The caesura is there to indicate a deep sharp breath between “and” and “fear.” If you aren’t familiar with the term, go here: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/caesura

fear.

This next section just got pared down, because I don’t really like the way the whole thing flows…it’s gonna need some more work. But I’ll do that with the second revision.

Maybe this is pre-trip-jitters, maybe fear-of-change. Maybe it’s just friction, tire rubber to wet concrete. Oil to piston to fan to exhaust to…

Somewhere Unknown. To autumn drift. To singing chill in fingertips, traffic, noise inner and outer.

Let silence descend into the mind. The hush of wind through still-thick foliage, as it drifts toward deeper winter slow. Allow all this to move through me:

the road

wind

worry

exoectation of damage, more mistakes to stack on the teetering pile, but

freedom.                          Motion.                           New.

The latter part I like alright for now. I’ll leave it alone for a couple of days, and come back to it with fresh eyes. Commentary is welcome. I have so much trouble revising…